5 Signs of Bladder Cancer: What Women Should Know

Bladder cancer may not be on your radar even if you’re vigilant about getting routine GYN care. After all, it’s far more common among men than women, and the majority of cases affect patients over age 65. However, don’t let those stats keep you from learning to spot the symptoms.

More than 17,000 women are diagnosed with bladder cancer every year in the United States. The Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network reports that women are more likely to be diagnosed with bladder cancer at an advanced stage because they may not be on the lookout for early signs.

Knowing the signs and symptoms can help you get diagnosed sooner, which may improve your prognosis. Here are five warning signs to watch for:

  1. Blood in the urine. This is the most common early symptom of bladder cancer. It’s easy for women to overlook because it’s typically painless and can go weeks or even months between occurrences. Many women ignore this symptom because they attribute it to menstruation or menopause.
  2. UTI-like symptoms. Bladder cancer can be mistaken for a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) because many of the symptoms overlap. Patients may experience increased frequency and urgency of urination, pain with urination, or urinary incontinence. If you’ve noticed any urinary problems—you have to go all the time, or you feel like you have to go but can’t, or you have a hard time emptying your bladder—or if antibiotics don’t seem to be helping your UTI symptoms, talk to your doctor.
  3. Unexplained pain. More advanced bladder cancers are often associated with pain. Pain can occur in the flank area, abdomen, or pelvis. Patients can also develop pain in their bones if the cancer has spread to their bones. If you’re having aches and pains in those areas, tell your doctor—especially if you’ve also had the aforementioned spotting or UTI symptoms.
  4. Decreased appetite. Appetite loss is a common cancer symptom, and bladder cancer is no exception. If the cancer has grown or spread, you might experience weight loss or feel tired and weak. Of course, there are plenty of other things that can mess with your appetite, so don’t automatically assume the worst—but do talk to your doctor about it if it persists.
  5. Smoking. According to the National Institutes of Health, about 50% of women diagnosed with bladder cancer are smokers. Smoking is the biggest risk factor for bladder cancer. If you notice any of the above symptoms and you smoke, let your doctor know as soon as possible.

Bladder cancer may be overlooked in women because it’s easy to chalk up symptoms to a stubborn UTI or normal vaginal spotting. Unfortunately, this means women are often diagnosed after the cancer has spread and it’s harder to treat. So if you’re worried, don’t just write off your symptoms. Call your doctor to determine if it’s a minor infection or something more serious. If it is bladder cancer, it’s easier to treat if you catch it early.

Written by Dr. Paul Littman


Pelvic Floor Disorder: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

According to the National Institutes of Health, roughly a quarter of U.S. women are affected by a pelvic floor disorder. Pelvic floor disorders are a result of weakened or injured muscles and connective tissue in the pelvic cavity that may cause a variety of uncomfortable symptoms making physical activity difficult and sexual intercourse painful.

What is the pelvic floor? What does it do?

The pelvic floor—which men and women both have—is a hammock-shaped group of muscles, connective tissues, and nerves that support the organs and help them function. Both men and women have a:

  • Bladder
  • Bowel
  • Rectum

Men also possess a prostate, whereas women possess a uterus and a vagina. These organs are also a part of the pelvic floor, which extends between the tailbone, pubic bone and hip bone.

What is a pelvic floor disorder?

A pelvic floor disorder refers to a dysfunction of any part of the pelvic floor, resulting in conditions such as:

  • Constipation, difficulties with emptying the bowels
  • Fecal incontinence, an inability to control bowel movements
  • Pain during intercourse or vaginal penetration
  • Pelvic organ prolapse, a weakness in the muscles that causes the organs to shift into the vaginal canal space
  • Urinary incontinence, a loss of control in managing the flow of urine

These conditions occur when the muscles become weakened or the connective tissue tears, typically due to trauma to the pelvic area, childbirth or natural deterioration with age. Genetics, excess weight (which places extra pressure on the pelvic floor) and lifestyle are also thought to play a role, as well as a variety of health issues such as:

  • Diabetes, which may impact how well the pelvic floor muscles function
  • Parkinson’s disease, a degenerative disease of the nervous system that affects nerves and muscle movement
  • Stroke, which can damage the part of the brain that controls bladder/bowel movement or include a medication regimen that causes incontinence as a side effect
  • Spinal stenosis, a narrowing of the spinal canal—typically in the neck or low back—that places pressure on the spinal cord or related nerves, potentially resulting in loss of bladder or bowel control

Symptoms can vary depending on which part of the pelvic floor is affected, but can include:

  • A feeling of needing to constantly have a bowel movement or a feeling of not completely emptying after a bowel movement
  • Any consistent pain in the pelvis, rectum or genital area, especially during intercourse
  • Painful or frequent urination
  • Pressure sensation in the vagina, such as the feeling that you are sitting on something or is protruding from the vagina
  • Straining or having to shift position in order to complete a bowel movement or while trying to empty the bladder

Although pelvic floor disorders may sound scary, they’re a fairly common issue, especially in women. In fact, according to one study, one-quarter of adult women in the U.S. report having at least one of these disorders.

What kind of doctor should I see for a pelvic floor disorder?

You can certainly speak to your OB/GYN or primary care provider (PCP) about the issues you are experiencing, but your best bet is to be seen by a urogynecologist or a urologist who specializes in pelvic floor disorders.

What is a urogynecologist?

A urogynecologist is a urologist or OB/GYN who opts to undergo highly-specific subspecialty training for conditions that impact the pelvic floor. This includes completing a fellowship—additional training after completing a residency program—that focuses on surgical and nonsurgical care of non-cancerous gynecologic issues.

When should I seek medical help for my pelvic floor disorder symptoms?

We understand that these issues can be uncomfortable to talk about, but they are common problems that can be medically managed with the right care. There is no reason to compromise your quality of life when there are plenty of treatment options available. Reach out to your PCP or OB/GYN for a urogynecologist recommendation.

At New Jersey Urology, we’re proud to have urogynecologists on staff to help patients living with these issues. Together, they offer years of combined experience in providing patients relief from pelvic floor disorders utilizing the latest techniques the industry has to offer, both surgical and nonsurgical, in a comfortable environment. This can include everything from specialized exercises (pelvic floor therapy) to a minimally invasive surgical repair of the pelvic floor.


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