3 Common Myths About Prostate Cancer Treatments, Debunked

14 Sep 2017 Blog

The internet is a never-ending double-edged sword. On the one hand, a world of indefinite knowledge is simply a click or touch away. On the other, misinformation is sometimes hidden under the guise of truth. This seems to be the case for a variety of topics, including prostate cancer.

Thankfully, we’re here to shed some light on some untruths regarding prostate cancer that the web has spun for far too long.

Myth #1: Ginger can treat and prevent prostate cancer.

Fact: Before we start badmouthing ginger, what we can say about this biting root is that it does have some wonderful stomach-soothing properties. Plus, it tastes great in tea. That said, it does absolutely nothing when it comes to treating or preventing prostate cancer.

Unfortunately, certain websites that cater to “natural” remedies for everything from hangnails to cancer will cling to small studies—such as this one—that merely hint or suggest a small kernel of truth to an otherwise unsubstantiated lie.

Myth #2: Golden berries aid in destroying prostate cancer cells.

Fact: This is also quite false. Think about it: If these berries had even the slightest hope of curing cancer, don’t you think science would be on this like white on rice?

Well, it isn’t. A simple Google search will show that there are no studies currently being conducted nor are there studies even suggesting that golden berries will effectively treat anything, let alone cure cancer.

What you will find, however, is a long list of “natural” websites regurgitating the same anecdotal evidence regarding this “magical” fruit. That, regrettably, is not proof.

Myth #3: Frequent ejaculation may reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

Fact: Of all the things you could do in your spare time to reduce your risk of developing prostate cancer, this one … Well, it basically lives at the bottom of the list.

There are studies that suggest a decreased risk of prostate cancer, but the number of ejaculations to decrease the risk has never been quantified. Also, researchers can’t figure out what one has to do with the other in the first place. That lack of understanding doesn’t bode well as a confidence booster, especially when it comes to health.

In short, we don’t recommend putting all of your eggs into this particular basket, no matter how enticing the idea may seem.

These medical rumors are truly dangerous as they promote themselves as alternates to lifesaving, science-based treatments, like robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and radiation therapy. By debunking these harmful myths, we hope to encourage men like you to be proactive with your health. We further implore you to trust science to help you detect prostate cancer early with yearly exams, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood tests and doctor follow-ups.

For more information about prostate cancer or to schedule an appointment with one of our urology specialists, contact us at one of our convenient locations today.

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