3 Common Myths About Prostate Cancer Treatments, Debunked

14 Sep 2017 Blog

The internet is a never-ending double-edged sword. On the one hand, a world of indefinite knowledge is simply a click or touch away. On the other, misinformation is sometimes hidden under the guise of truth. This seems to be the case for a variety of topics, including prostate cancer.

Thankfully, we’re here to shed some light on some untruths regarding prostate cancer that the web has spun for far too long.

Myth #1: Ginger can treat and prevent prostate cancer.

Fact: Before we start badmouthing ginger, what we can say about this biting root is that it does have some wonderful stomach-soothing properties. Plus, it tastes great in tea. That said, it does absolutely nothing when it comes to treating or preventing prostate cancer.

Unfortunately, certain websites that cater to “natural” remedies for everything from hangnails to cancer will cling to small studies—such as this one—that merely hint or suggest a small kernel of truth to an otherwise unsubstantiated lie.

Myth #2: Golden berries aid in destroying prostate cancer cells.

Fact: This is also quite false. Think about it: If these berries had even the slightest hope of curing cancer, don’t you think science would be on this like white on rice?

Well, it isn’t. A simple Google search will show that there are no studies currently being conducted nor are there studies even suggesting that golden berries will effectively treat anything, let alone cure cancer.

What you will find, however, is a long list of “natural” websites regurgitating the same anecdotal evidence regarding this “magical” fruit. That, regrettably, is not proof.

Myth #3: Frequent ejaculation may reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

Fact: Of all the things you could do in your spare time to reduce your risk of developing prostate cancer, this one … Well, it basically lives at the bottom of the list.

There are studies that suggest a decreased risk of prostate cancer, but the number of ejaculations to decrease the risk has never been quantified. Also, researchers can’t figure out what one has to do with the other in the first place. That lack of understanding doesn’t bode well as a confidence booster, especially when it comes to health.

In short, we don’t recommend putting all of your eggs into this particular basket, no matter how enticing the idea may seem.

These medical rumors are truly dangerous as they promote themselves as alternates to lifesaving, science-based treatments, like robotic-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and radiation therapy. By debunking these harmful myths, we hope to encourage men like you to be proactive with your health. We further implore you to trust science to help you detect prostate cancer early with yearly exams, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood tests and doctor follow-ups.

For more information about prostate cancer or to schedule an appointment with one of our urology specialists, contact us at one of our convenient locations today.

Do Male Fertility Supplements Work?

16 Aug 2017 Blog

If you’re a male that struggles with infertility, you might have been tempted to try one of the many male fertility supplements that are available on the market. But do they really help increase sperm count and mobility, or are they completely ineffective?

A lot of research has been done to study the effectiveness of fertility supplements, but evidence is still limited because of the variations in dosage and questions about the cause of infertility in patients.

Supplements for Male Infertility

Though the effectiveness of supplements is questionable, there are a few supplements that have shown promise for increasing sperm count and mobility:

  • Zinc and Folate Supplements Folate is known as a vitamin that’s used for healthy pregnancies, but it can also increase sperm count and motility when used in combination with zinc supplements.
  • Vitamins A, C, and E These antioxidant vitamins might help increase fertility because they can potentially reduce oxidative stress. Stress is known to reduce sperm count.
  • Coenzyme Q-10 Similar to vitamins A, C, and E, coenzyme Q-10 has been known to protect cells from oxidative stress, which can be beneficial for damaged sperm.
  • Carnitine Carnitine is an amino acid that helps your body turn fat to energy. According to recent studies, it can also help sperm cells generate the energy they need to function optimally.
  • Selenium Selenium has been shown to increase sperm count and motility when taken with other vitamins, especially if a man has low selenium levels.

Treating Male Infertility in New Jersey

Sperm cells are sensitive, and they require good nutrition and antioxidants to perform properly. In order to come up with the best treatment for male infertility, it’s important to consult a physician before trying any supplements. In order to get to the root of the problem, a urologist will typically perform at least one of the following tests:

  • Sperm and semen analysis
  • Physical exam
  • Hormone evaluation
  • Testicular biopsy

If you’re struggling with male infertility and are ready to get answers, contact an NJU office near you. Our urologists will give you the care you need to effectively treat infertility.

Men’s Health Month: Cancer in Men

16 Jun 2017 Blog

June is men’s health month and we want to take the time to educate you on important facts regarding your health or the health of the men in your life.

Top Cancers in Men

Out of the top 6 most common cancers in men, 3 of them are urology related:

Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is #1 on the list of most common cancers in men. According to the most accurate recent figures in 2014, 233,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, which is about 27% of all cancer diagnoses. About 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime. The average age for this diagnosis is between the ages of 65-69 and that accounts for 65% of all diagnoses.

The prostate is a gland that assists with reproduction, but as you age, it increases in size and can lead to complications such as BPH and prostate cancer.

What can you do?

There are two tests you can get, the PSA and DRE tests. Getting screened isn’t necessarily a guarantee you can get diagnosed and treated, but it can help if your urologist thinks you make be at risk for prostate cancer. Talk to your urologist if you think you should be screened.

Bladder Cancer

Bladder cancer is #4 on the list of the most common cancers in men. It’s estimated that about 56,000 men will be diagnosed with bladder cancer. Unlike prostate cancer, which tends to be more genetically caused, bladder cancer is preventable. However, if not treated early, bladder cancer can spread to lymph nodes of the pelvis, abdomen or even the neck.

What can you do?

A mentioned, while the risk of bladder cancer can increase from family history and other genetic factors, age and smoking are the two biggest risk factors. Most men diagnosed are over the age of 70, but smoking can increase your risk at any age. Quitting smoking can help significantly reduce your chances of getting bladder cancer (and lung cancer, which is #2 on the most common cancers in men list)

Kidney Cancer

Lastly, kidney cancer, also known as renal cancer, is #6 on the list. About 39,000 cases of kidney cancer are expected to be diagnosed in men. Most cases of kidney cancer first appear in the lining of small tubes in the kidney called tubules. Luckily, most of the time this is found before it spreads. Most men diagnosed are 60 or older.

What can you do?

Two big risk factors for kidney cancer are smoking and obesity. If you quit smoking and try to live a healthier lifestyle (being more active, eating more rich fruits and vegetables and less fatty meats) can greatly reduce your chances of getting kidney cancer

In light of men’s health month, schedule an appointment with your urologist for a check up!

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