A Urological Approach to Men’s Preventative Health

19 Nov 2018 Blog

Written by Dr. Andrew Siegel

With respect to their health, women are usually adept at preventive care and commonly see an internist or gynecologist regularly. On the other hand, men—who could certainly take a lesson from the fairer sex—are generally not good at seeing doctors for routine checkups. Not only has our culture indoctrinated in men the philosophy of “playing through pain,” but also the lack of necessity of seeking medical care when not having a specific problem or pain (and even when men do develop dangerous health warning signs, many choose to ignore them.). Consequently, many men have missed out on some vital opportunities: to be screened for risks that can lead to future medical issues; be diagnosed with problems that cause no symptoms (such as high blood pressure, glaucoma and prostate cancer); and counseled regarding means of modifying risk factors and optimizing health.

Many Men Don’t Have A Doc

Urologists evaluate and treat a large roster of male patients, a surprising number of whom have not sought healthcare elsewhere and do not have a primary physician. Urological visits offer an opportunity to not only focus on the specific urological complaint that drives the visit (usually urinary or sexual problems), but also to take a more encompassing holistic health approach, emphasizing modifications in diet, physical activity, and other lifestyle factors that can prevent many untoward consequences and maximize health. By getting men engaged in the healthcare system on a timely basis, they can be helped to minimize those risk factors that typically cause the illnesses that afflict men as they age.

Identifying and modifying risk factors can mitigate, if not prevent, a number of common maladies. Modifiable risk factors for the primary killer of men—cardiovascular disease—include poor diet, obesity, physical inactivity, excessive alcohol, tobacco consumption, stress, high blood pressure, high blood glucose and diabetes, high cholesterol, obstructive sleep apnea, low testosterone, and depression. The bottom line is that every patient contact provides an opportunity for so much more than merely treating the sexual or urinary complaint that brought the patient into the office. Furthermore, many systemic disease processes—including diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular diseases, etc.—have urological manifestations and symptoms that can be identified by the urologist who in turn can make a referral to the appropriate health care provider.

Erections are an Indicator of Health

Many men may not cherish seeing doctors on a routine basis, but a tipping point occurs when it comes to their penises not functioning! Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common reason for men to “bite the bullet” and call their friendly urologist for a consultation. The holistic approach by the consultant urologist is to not only manage the ED, but to diagnose the underlying risk factors that can be a sign of broader health issues than simply poor quality erections. Importantly, ED can be a warning sign of an underlying medical problem, since the quality of erections serves as a barometer of cardiovascular health.

Since the penile arteries are small in diameter and the coronary (heart) arteries larger, it stands to reason that if vascular disease—generally a systemic process that is diffuse and not localized—is affecting the tiny penile arteries, it may affect the larger coronary arteries as well, if not now, then at some time in the future. In other words, the fatty deposits that compromise blood flow to the smaller vessels of the penis may also do so to the larger vessels of the heart and thus ED may be considered a “stress test.” In fact, the presence of ED is as much of a predictor of cardiovascular disease as is a strong family history of cardiac problems, tobacco smoking, or elevated cholesterol. For this reason, men with ED should undergo a medical evaluation seeking arterial disease elsewhere in the body (heart, brain, aorta, and peripheral blood vessels).

Urologists have a broad network of colleagues (including internists, cardiologists, pulmonologists, gastroenterologists, medical oncologists, radiologists, radiation oncologists, general surgeons, etc.) that can be collaborated with and to whom patients can be referred to if and when their expertise is needed.

Urine is Golden

Of all the bodily secretions that humans produce, urine uniquely provides one of the best “tells” regarding health. A simple and inexpensive urinary dipstick can diagnose diabetes, kidney disease, urinary tract infection, the presence of blood and hydration status, in a matter of moments.

What a dipstick can reveal:

  • specific gravity… hydration status
  • pH…acidity of urine
  • leukocytes…urinary infection
  • blood…many urological disorders including kidney and bladder cancer
  • nitrite…urinary infection
  • bilirubin…a yellow pigment found in bile, a substance made by the liver; its presence may be indicative of jaundice
  • protein…kidney disease
  • glucose…diabetes

Bottom Line: Preventive and proactive care—as many pursue regularly for their prized automobiles (e.g., lubrication and oil changes, replacing worn belts before they snap while on the road, etc.)—provides numerous advantages. The same strategy should be applied to the human machine! Since contact with a urologist may be a man’s only connection with the healthcare system, a vital opportunity exists for the urologist to offer holistic care in addition to specialty genital and urinary care. The goal is to empower men by getting them invested in their own health in order to minimize disease risk and optimize vitality.

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